What I Love About Banned Books Week (September 30–October 6, 2012)

October 5, 2012 § 1 Comment

What I love about Banned Books Week is that I learn about books I want to read that I otherwise would never have heard of.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
On Top Ten Challenged Books of 2011 List
According to the American Library Association (ALA), challenged for offensive language; racism; religious viewpoint; sexually explicit; unsuited to age group.

When I read this line from Goodreads, “leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot” I threw my head back and laughed. Awesome. I can so relate, having gone to a nearly-all-white high school where some of the students thought it was okay to tell black jokes in front of me. Wonder why this book was challenged? Minorities aren’t supposed to have a viewpoint?

Alice (series), by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
On Top Ten Challenged Books of 2011 List
According to the ALA, challenged for nudity; offensive language; religious viewpoint.

I read the excerpt from Achingly Alice, number 10 in the series, and I sure wish I had had these books to read when I was in junior high. A review mentions that one of the topics Alice thinks about is masturbation. Okay, I really would have liked to have known at fourteen that I was not the only one thinking about these kinds of things. Wonder why this was challenged? Are adolescent girls not supposed to have a viewpoint, especially not about their bodies or sexuality?

Nickel and Dimed, by Barbara Ehrenreich
On Top Ten Challenged Books of 2010 List
According to the ALA, challenged for drugs, inaccurate, offensive language, political viewpoint, and religious viewpoint.

Really excited to read this and remember what it’s like to work a crap wage job, as my novel-in-progress’ main character does. It’s been awhile since I was there, and I was all too happy to relegate to distant memory the hysteria that arises when you are trying to decide between gas money and food, or wipe out your savings to pay for the extraction of an excrutiating abscessed tooth. Interested to find out what about this book was challenged. Poor people aren’t supposed to have a viewpoint?

Banned Books Week is September 30 through October 6 and celebrates our freedom to read. Click here to see ALA’s list of top ten challenged books by year.

What are your favorite books that show up on challenged lists? Do you learn about books that interest you that you only heard about because they were challenged?

Tagged: , , , , , ,

§ One Response to What I Love About Banned Books Week (September 30–October 6, 2012)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

What’s this?

You are currently reading What I Love About Banned Books Week (September 30–October 6, 2012) at Read, Write, Bliss.

meta

%d bloggers like this: